Maddox Smith Staff asked 4 years ago

Own Historical Character

This    is    an    opportunity    to    be    creative.    In    your    blog    entries,    you    are    asked    to    imagine    how    your    personage    would    encounter    the    events    we    are    discussing    in    lecture.    You    will    write    in    the    first    person,    as    though    you    are    living    through    the    period    in    question.    The    task    is    to    provide    historical    context    for    how    an    individual    might    experience    the    world    around    them    at    the    time.    To    do    this    effectively,    and    not    abstractly,    you    will    need    to    draw    on    your    textbook    readings,    the    discussion    group    documents,    and    lecture    notes.    Each    installment    will    be    500-750    words    in    length.        You    will    create    your    own    historical    character.    There    are    some    restrictions.    The    task    is    to    think    about    European    historical    events    and    how    they    affected    the    ordinary    person.    You    may    not    write    from    the    perspective    of    kings,    queens,    religious    or    military    leaders.    Your    person    should    not    be    an    actual    historical    figure.    Since    you    will    be    writing    several    entries    over    the    course    of    the    semester,    you    can’t    limit    yourself    to    someone    specific.    Rather,    together    with    your    TA    in    the    first    discussion    group,    you    will    craft    a    composite    character    who    will,    in    a    sense,    follow    you    through    the    next    200    years    of    history.            In    the    first    discussion    group,    come    prepared    with    some    of    these    ideas    already    sketched    out    in    your    mind.    Your    first    blog    entry,    due    Friday January    20th,    will    incorporate    many    of    these    details.    ••name •sex •religion    (Protestant,    Catholic,    Jewish,    Muslim;    you    may    also    want    to    note    the    intensity    or casualness    of    your    family’s    religious    practice) •place    of    origin,    nationality,    and    class    background    –    imperial    subject,    citizen,    refugee,    migrant. If    you    grew    up    in    a    two    -parent    or    father-only    family,    your    social    class    is    most    easily    identified by    your    father’s    line    of    work.    If    you    were    raised    by    your    mother    alone,    her    background    and    the circumstances    of    her    single    mothering    —    unwed?    divorced?    widowed?    –will    be    crucial,    as    will her    class    background.